F.I.A. FEDERATION INTERNATIONALE AUTOMOBILES

The governing body of international motorsport

 

 

FIA

 

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The Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile, commonly referred to as the FIA, claims to be a non-profit association established on June 20, 1904 to represent the interest of motoring organisations and private motor car users.

 

It was founded as the Association Internationale des Automobile Clubs Reconnus (AIACR), which describes its structure as an international organisation of national clubs. Headquartered at 8, Place de la Concorde, Paris, France.  At this time the FIA consists of 207 national member organisations in 122 countries worldwide at time of going to press. Its current president is Max Mosley. You may wish to use the links on this page to obtain up to date information.

 

 

Design genius

 

Nelson says:  "Organisations purporting to represent 

any sport should be sporting and accountable!"

 

 

This article is derived from other articles on the internet and published in accordance with US fair use guidance and Article 10 of the European Convention of Human Rights.  We have no connection with or any other affiliation to the FIA, the UIM, FIFA, FAI, or any other sport governing body, although some records reviewed on this and other sites may be recorded with one or other of these organisations, or the Guinness Book of Records.

 

For the general public, the FIA is mostly known as the governing body for motor racing events. In 1922, the FIA delegated the organisation of automobile racing to the CSI (Commission Sportive Internationale), an autonomous committee that later became the FISA (Fédération Internationale du Sport Automobile). A restructuring of the FIA in 1993 lead to the disappearance of the FISA, putting motor racing under direct management of the FIA.

 

As is the case with soccer's FIFA, the FIA is generally known by its French name and acronym, even in English-speaking countries, but is occasionally rendered as International Automobile Federation.

 

 

Structure of the FIA

 

At first glance the FIA comprises a bewildering number of departments and personnel all of which must be paid for.  Hence, although stated as a not for profit concern, it would seem reasonable to assume that large sums of money change hands when doing deals with other so-called sporting event organizers, the motivation for which is profit.

  • FIA General Assembly – the Federation's supreme governing body, consisting of the presidents of the FIA's numerous member clubs.

    • FIA President – also serves as chairman of the General Assembly

      • FIA Deputy President for Mobility and the Automobile

        • FIA World Council for Mobility and the Automobile – governs all non-sporting FIA activities

        • Mobility and Automobile commissions

      • FIA Deputy President for Sport

        • FIA World Motor Sport Council – governs all the sporting events regulated by the FIA

        • Sporting commissions

  • FIA Senate

  • FIA International Court of Appeal

  • FIA Secretariat

 

Members 

 

AA, Great Britain

ACF, France

ADAC, Germany

AvD, Germany

AAA, USA

CCC, Great Britain

FIVA, Great Britain

JAF, Japan

MSA, Great Britain

RAC, Great Britain

TCI, Italy

PZM, Poland

 

 

Event History

 

In 1950, the FIA organised the first World Championship for race car drivers in racing events, known today as Formula One.  Since, Bernie Ecclestone is advertised as the boss of Formula One, it is not clear what part the FIA played or their contribution.

 

In 1955, the FIA created the World Endurance Championship, the first points series for sports car racing in the world. This championship only had scoring for manufacturers until 1981. From 1982, with the new Group C prototype regulations, a drivers championship was added. In 1973, the FIA organised the first World Rally Championship. The Rallye Automobile Monte Carlo became the first ever FIA World Rally Championship event.

 

Clearly, to be able to sustain its present staffing levels and offices, it is in the interest of the FIA to protect deals with other sporting associations, although such practices may be incompatible with the integrity of the organisation. 

 

 

Events

 

The FIA currently regulates the following events:

 

FIA Formula One World Championship

FIA World Rally Championship

FIA World Touring Car Championship

FIA GP2 (formerly Formula 3000) Int. Championship

FIA GT Championship

CIK-FIA Karting World Championship

FIA European Touring Car Championship

FIA European Truck Racing Cup

FIA Cross-Country Rally World Cup

FIA European Drag Racing Championship

FIA European Autocross Championship

FIA European Rallycross Championship

FIA Alternative Energies Cup

FIA European Hill Climb Championship

FIA International Hill Climb Challenge

FIA European Hill Climb Cup

FIA Historic Racing Championships

FIA Historic Rally Championship

FIA Historic Regularity Runs

FIA Historic Hill Climb Championship

FIA European Rally Cups

FIA Middle-East Rally Championship

FIA African Rally Championship

FIA Asia-Pacific Rally Championship

FIA European Rally Championship

A1 Grand Prix

 

Does the FIA have an association have a hidden agenda as the governing motor sport?  It appears from the BBC article below that certain officials may be intertwined with other sporting interests.  In particular, we received a similar letter to that seen below from a company known to be associated with Bernie Ecclestone.  We were going about our business providing free information to the public, contacts and articles of general interest, when out of the blue poured threatening correspondence like this:-

 

 

 

 

Letter from the FIA dated 15 May 2006

 

 

It must be obvious to anyone that our site is not connected with any other sporting or other official body, since we are not involved in motor sport and offer no services requiring authorisation. Nor do we claim affiliation.  If that were to be the case, then in light of the number of topics covered, we would need to be a very large entity indeed.  Whereas, we believe a number of organisations go a little too far in seeking to prevent honest competition in seeking to secure exclusive rights and bring about a monopoly situation.  This is of course extremely unsporting behaviour and anti competitive activity, which copyright law is not designed for.

 

Whereas, major sports such as motor racing and football are organised by money hungry individuals, the evidence for which is the wealth amassed by those in positions of control.  Should sport be controlled in this fashion?  This is a question often asked by the public.  Should sporting bodies be allowed to enjoy a monopoly position, by virtue of their not for profit status, where companies would be subjected to regulation from the Monopolies Commissions?  

 

With respect to the above letter, it appears that the FIA are seeking to prevent Max Energy Limited providing information about their organisation (the FIA) to the general public.  One reason for this is that the Internet is a level playing field, a competitive situation many large organisations are not familiar with.  Using the Internet, a small concern, even an individual, can compete against the largest of companies and even governments, publication wise, provided the smaller concern observes the rules.  Our advice to anyone confronted with this situation is don't be intimidated.  There are Anti-Trust and Anti-Monopoly laws which uphold your right to publish, investigate and expose potential Cartels.  Stick to the facts and if necessary make formal complaint to the authorities. Copyright law does not protect Cartels, etc.

 

The following article by the BBC

 

 

 

---------------

RELATED BBC SITES

 

  Monday, 11 October, 2004

 

The main men in F1

The row over the future of the British Grand Prix has highlighted the huge influence Bernie Ecclestone holds within Formula One.

BBC Sport profiles Ecclestone and Max Mosley, F1's other major powerbroker.

 

 

BERNIE ECCLESTONE

Mosley (left) and Ecclestone wield the power in F1

Bernie Ecclestone made Formula One what it is today, and he rules the sport through a mixture of fear, respect and acute business acumen.

 

The one-time motorcyle salesman can claim pretty much all the credit for transforming the sport into the huge global brand it is today.

 

It was Ecclestone who started the F1 revolution in the 1980s by persuading team owners that he should negotiate on their behalf for television and marketing rights.

 

As a result, he is now an extremely wealthy man.

Reputed to be worth Ł2.3bn, Ecclestone and his family occupied eighth position on the Sunday Times Rich List for 2004.

His love of motor racing began in the 1950s, but a crash ended his career as a driver.

 

He then moved into management. His first client was Stuart Lewis-Evans, who was killed in a crash. Ecclestone then managed the Austrian Jochen Rindt, who also died in a crash but became the first driver to be posthumously named world champion.

 

In the 1970s, Ecclestone bought the Brabham team. He sold the company in the late 1980s, and then launched his bid to overhaul F1's commercial arrangements. Ecclestone now owns a network of companies which have the exclusive right to sell and market the International Automobile Federation's (FIA) TV rights.

 

In 2000, the FIA agreed to lease him the rights for 100 years, which further increased his position. In March 2000, he sold 50% of one of his companies, Slec Holdings, to German broadcaster EM.TV.

 

The shares then passed to media giant Kirch, which acquired another 25% of the business, leaving Ecclestone with 25%. Kirch collapsed in 2002, with three banks - Bayerische Landesbank, Lehman Brothers and JPMorgan - taking over its stake in F1. 

 

While talks go on about the sale of the banks' shares, Ecclestone's grip on the sport remains is undiminished. Now 73, he has often said that the pursuit of wealth is no longer the main driving force in his life. But, as the dispute over the future of Silverstone has shown, Ecclestone will never allow himself to come off second best in any deal.

 

 

MAX MOSLEY

 

Mosley is the son of controversial MP Oswald Mosley, the leader of the British Union of Fascists in the 1930s.

 

At one time he considered a career in politics, but was advised against it because it was thought his family background would count against him. The qualified barrister has, however, used his skills to good effect as president of motorsport's governing body the FIA.

 

While Ecclestone has a reputation as a streetwise wheeler-dealer, Mosley is seen as a cerebral operator, responsible for implementing a raft of changes to the way the sport is run. His involvement with motor racing began in the late 1960s when he co-founded March - a racing car manufacturer.

 

The company then moved into building F1 cars and built up a dominant position in American Indy Car racing in the 1980s. Mosley, however, extricated himself from March to concentrate on F1 politics. He was Ecclestone's lawyer during a bitter dispute within the sport in the early 1980s, and played a key role in drafting the Concorde Agreement which settled the issue and still governs F1 today.

 

By 1991, Mosley had become president of the sporting arm of the FIA. Two years later, he was elected president of the whole federation. Through the FIA, he has involved himself in road safety, and takes pride in the part he played in the introduction of the Euro NCAP crash test standards.

 

Over the years, Mosley has had a number of spats with F1 car makers over his plans for the sport. He announced in July that he intended to quit his FIA role at the end of the season, saying that he found discussions with team owners increasingly tedious.

 

But he subsequently decided to stay on until at least October 2005 after the FIA senate asked him not to step down. Mosley has also had public rows with Ecclestone. But many F1 insiders believe these are just part of a well crafted plan to strengthen their control over the sport.

 

Whatever team owners, manufacturers and F1 fans may think of them, few would dispute that the pair form a brilliant and powerful double act.

 

 

 

 

For those of you interested in learning more of the politics and rules governing the FIA, their Statutes are a logical place to begin research:-

 

 

FIA STATUTES

Contents

 

ARTICLE 1
ARTICLE 2 - Object of The FIA
ARTICLE 3 - Composition of The FIA
ARTICLE 4 - Sporting Power
ARTICLE 5 - Exercise of the Sporting Power
ARTICLE 6 - Obligations of FIA Members
ARTICLE 7 - Structure of The FIA
ARTICLE 8 - General Assembly
ARTICLE 9 - Terms of Reference of the General Assembly
ARTICLE 10 - Agenda of the General Assembly
ARTICLE 11 - Voting at General Assemblies
ARTICLE 12 - Committee
ARTICLE 13 - The World Council for Mobility and the Automobile
ARTICLE 14 - The World Motor Sport Council
ARTICLE 15 - Terms of Reference for the World Council For Mobility and the Automobile
ARTICLE 16 - Terms of Reference of The World Motor Sport Council
ARTICLE 17 - The Senate
ARTICLE 18 - The FIA Academy
ARTICLE 19 - President - Deputy President - Vice-President
ARTICLE 20 - Mobility and Automobile Regions
ARTICLE 21 - Sporting Commissions
ARTICLE 22 - Interruption of terms of Office
ARTICLE 23 - International Court of Appeal
ARTICLE 24 - Administration
ARTICLE 25 - Finances
ARTICLE 26 - Admissions
ARTICLE 27 - Resignations - Striking off the Rolls - Expelling - Sanctions
ARTICLE 28 - Dissolution
ARTICLE 29 - Amendments
ARTICLE 30 - Interpretation of the Statutes

 

 

 

MAX MOSLEY - PRESIDENT of the FIA

 

Max Rufus Mosley (born 1940, London, England) is currently serving his fourth term as president of the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile.

 

Mosley is the second son of the British fascist leader Sir Oswald Mosley and Diana Mitford. He attended Christ Church, Oxford, graduating with a degree in physics in 1961. During his time at Oxford he was Secretary of the Oxford Union. He studied law at Gray's Inn in London and qualified as a barrister in 1964. He raced in club events in the UK during 1966 and 1967 followed by Formula Two for the London Racing Team and with Frank Williams's Formula Two team in 1968. He retired from driving in 1969 and went into racing car production as one of the founders of March. He met with some success in Formula One, March finishing third in the Constructors' Championship in 1970 and 1971, with Ronnie Peterson second in the drivers' World Championship in 1971 and great success in the profitable business of selling Formula Two and other types of customer cars.

 

 

Max Mosely

 

Max Mosley - President FIA 4th term

 

 

In the early 1970s he became involved with FOCA, the Formula One Constructors Association, a union of teams created to defend the teams' rights and maintain their collective control of the sport. At the end of 1977 Mosley officially withdrew from constructing and became legal advisor to FOCA. He was later elected as president of the FISA (Fédération Internationale du Sport Automobile, a committee of the FIA. A later restructuring of the FIA led to the demise of FISA and Mosley was elected president of the FIA.

 

At the time Bernie Ecclestone was the president of FOCA and Jean Marie Balestre president of FISA. The two clashed repeatedly over various regulation and financial issues, fighting for control of the sport. Mosley helped resolve this debate by drawing up the Concorde Agreement, giving FISA control of the rules and FOCA control of promotion and television rights.

 

Shortly thereafter Mosley disappeared entirely from Formula One for three years, but returned in 1986 to become president of the FISA Manufacturers' Commission and establish the Simtek Research construction team. He sold his share of Simtek in 1991 when he was elected president of the FIA, deposing Jean Marie Balestre by 43 votes to 29. He resigned a year later, stating that he would rather be elected on his own merits than the mistakes of his predecessor; the FIA immediately re-elected him for a four-year term. He was elected to his second term in October 1997, his third in 2001 and fourth in 2005.

 

Mosley's supporters point out that all the rule changes have had the support of the Formula One teams as required by the Concorde Agreement. Concerning Indianapolis, Mosley has said that the FIA had no choice but to run the race with six cars because the Michelin teams would not discuss any solution except a chicane which would have meant racing on a circuit which had not been properly approved. This would have put everyone in an impossible position in law in the event of an accident.

 

In June 2004 Mosley announced that he would step down from his position in October of that year. However, in July 2004 he rescinded his decision after the FIA Senate called for him to stay on. His term expires in October 2009 although speculation remains that he will step down before that.

 

Mosley and Bernie Ecclestone retain almost complete authority over Formula One racing; amongst other events, the FIA currently regulates the Formula One World Championship, the World Rally Championship, and the GT Championship.

 

Mosley for a time was interested in becoming a Conservative MP, as with his father, switched his allegiance to the Labour Party after meeting its then leader, John Smith, in 1994.

 

 

 

Fans have criticized Mosley for many of his rule changes and blamed him for situations such as that surrounding the 2005 United States Grand Prix

 

 

 

 FIA GENERAL ASSEMBLY

 

The FIA General Assembly is the supreme governing body of the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. It consists of the presidents of each of the FIA's member clubs and national organizations. Its one scheduled annual meeting is entitled the "Ordinary General Assembly"; in addition, the Assembly or the FIA President may call an "Extraordinary General Assembly" if necessary.

 

According to Wikipedia, the General Assembly's responsibilities in the administration of the FIA are:

 

  1. Determining the location of the FIA Headquarters, currently at 8, Place de la Concorde, Paris, France

  2. Approving the annual reports of the World Motor Sport Council and World Council for Mobility and the Automobile

  3. Approving the Fédération's accounts from the previous year and budget for the next year

  4. Electing the following Fédération officers, each for a term of four years, by absolute majority:

  5. Electing the seventeen members of the World Council for Mobility and the Automobile and the fourteen members of the World Motor Sport Council by simple majority to four-year terms

  6. Electing one-third of the Titular members and one-third of the Deputy members of the FIA International Court of Appeal by simple majority to one-year terms

  7. Electing the Secretary-General of the International Court of Appeal by simple majoity to a four-year term

  8. Electing the members of the FIA Sporting Commissions on the recommendation of the World Motor Sport Council and the members of the FIA International Historic Commission on the recommendation of the Senate by simple majority to one-year terms

  9. Approving the International Sporting Calendar, proposed by the World Motor Sport Council, by simple majority

  10. Approving modifications to the FIA Statutes by simple majority, admitting new members, and expelling or sactioning present members

  11. Approving the Internal Regulations of the FIA

  12. Modifying the International Sporting Code at the suggestion of the World Motor Sport Council

  13. Electing the three members of the FIA Audit Committee to one-year terms

  14. Approving the Audit Committee's Specific Internal Regulations

 

 

 

FI INDEPENDENT DATA Q&A

 

What is the Federation Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and why was it created?

What is a Grand Prix?

How is the World Champion title awarded?

What is the scale of points?

How many Grands Prix are held every year?

Is the Grand prix timetable always the same?

Can any circuit host a Grand Prix?

What is a Grade 1 circuit?

What is meant by the "constructor" of a Formula One car?

What criteria must a car constructor meet to be able to participate?

Does each constructor have to compete throughout the season?

Can any driver compete in a Grand Prix?

Are the teams allowed to change driver during the season?

Do Formula One cars have better brakes than series produced cars?

Is a special type of fuel used in Formula One?

How many tyres are permitted per car at each grand prix?

How is the type of rubber selected?

Are the cars checked during the event?

How are the fuel checks carried out?

Are such things as ABS brakes, stability control or four wheel steering allowed in Formula One?

But these are commonplace on road cars?

How can the FIA check? How can prohibited electronic functions be detected?

What role does the technical delegate play?

Who are the stewards and what are their powers?

What types of sanctions may be imposed?

What is a "time penalty"?

Are the stewards decisions final?

What is the International court of appeal?

What are the duties of the Clerk of the Course and the Race Director?

How is the race started?

How are false starts detected?

What happens if a driver stalls on the starting grid?

What procedure is followed if more than one driver is unable to start of the formation lap?

Are there special starting procedures in the event of rain?

Can the race be stopped?

What procedures apply when the race is stopped?

Is the race stopped in case of rain?

When is the safety car used?

What is the safety car procedure?

Do the laps covered behind the safety car count?

May a car stop at its pit whilst the safety car is on the track?

Is refuelling allowed during the race?

Are there any speed limits?

In what conditions are the cars weighed?

What are the flag signals?

Does the chequered flag always signal the finish?

Is private testing on circuits permitted?

 

 

 

ABOUT THE FIA AS THE GOVERNING BODY OF MOTOR SPORT WORLD WIDE

 

 

 

 

 

 FIA POSTAL ADDRESS

 

8, Place de la Concorde
75008 Paris
France
Tél.: +33 1 43 12 44 55
Fax.: +33 1 43 12 44 66

Services Administratifs / Administration :
2, Chemin de Blandonnet
1215 Genčve 15
Suisse / Switzerland
Tél : +41 22 544 44 00
Fax : +41 22 544 44 50 (Sport)
Fax : +41 22 544 45 50 (Tourisme et Automobile)
_____________________________________

The Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile is a
Federation recognised by the International Olympic Committee



Click here to access the official web site of the
International Olympic Committee
__________________________

 

 

 

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F.I.A.


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[ Consumer Policy ] [ Travel & Tourism ] [ Press ]
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UNRELATED  FIA ACRONYMS

 

 

Acronym

 

Definition

 

FIA

Factory Insurance Association

FIA

Fallen in Action (obsolete)

FIA

False Independence Assumption

FIA

Family Independence Agency

FIA

Fault Isolation Assistant

FIA

Federal Insurance Administration

FIA

Federal Investigation Authority (Pakistan)

FIA

Federal Investigators Association

FIA

Federation Internationale de l'Automobile (Auto Racing)

FIA

Federation Internationale de l'Automobile (body governing autosport)

FIA

Feline Infectious Anemia

FIA

Fellow of the Institute of Actuaries (UK)

FIA

Fiberoptic Industry Association (cable installers, component suppliers, training providers)

FIA

File Integrity Assessment (CSI)

FIA

Financial Inventory Accounting

FIA

Fire Island Association (New York)

FIA

Fitness Industry Association (Great Britain)

FIA

Fitness Institute Australia

FIA

Fixed Incident Angle

FIA

Flame Ionization Analysis

FIA

Flanders International Airport (Belgium)

FIA

Flexible Investment Annuity (Insurance; the Principal Financial Group)

FIA

Flight Information Area

FIA

Flow Injection Analysis

FIA

Fluoroimmunoassay

FIA

Footwear Industries of America (now part of American Apparel and Footwear Association)

FIA

Force Integration Analysis

FIA

Forensic Investigative Associates

FIA

Forest Inventory & Analysis

FIA

Forging Industry Association

FIA

Freedom of Information Act

FIA

Fuel Ignition Analyzer

FIA

Functional Interface Activity

FIA

functional interoperability architecture (US DoD)

FIA

Fundamental Iterative Algorithm

FIA

Funds-In Agreement

FIA

Future Imagery Architecture

FIA

Futures Industry Association

 

 

 

VEHICLE HISTORY A - Z

 

 

Abarth

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Volvo

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Yamaha

Yugo

 

 

 

REFERENCES and LINKS:

 

The FIA's official website

A diagram of the structure of the FIA

Statutes of the FIA

Article 8 and Article 9 of the FIA Statutes, General Assembly's operation and responsibilities

Article 10, which details its agenda

Article 11, which details its voting procedures

The main men in F1. BBC Sport (11 October 2004).

 

 

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RACING DRIVERS INDEX

 

 

 

 

A - Z OF WORLD FAMOUS RACING CIRCUITS

 

Aintree

Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez

Autódromo Internacional Nelson Piquet

Autódromo José Carlos Pace (Brazil)

Bahrain International

Barcelona-Catalunya, Circuit de 

Bathurst (Australia)

Brands Hatch

Bremgarten Circuit

Brooklands

Donington Park

Fuji Speedway

Giles Villeneuve

Goodwood

Hockenheimring

Imola

Indianapolis

Knockhill

Korea International Circuit

Laguna Seca (CA, USA)

Le Mans

Mallory Park

Monaco

Monte Carlo

Monza

Nurburgring [Nordschleife] (Germany)

Oulton Park

Rockingham

Santa Pod Raceway

Sebring International Raceway

Shanghai International

Silverstone

Snetterton

Spa Francorchamps (Belgium)

Suzuka Circuit

Thruxton

Zandvoort, Circuit Park

Zeltweg (Austria - Red Bull)

 

 

 

 

UK VEHICLE INSURANCE ONLINE A - Z

 

No matter what car, van or bike you drive, we're all looking for great value and quality in our UK motor insurance?  But who is the best - who is the cheapest and who offers the great service in the event of a claim?

 

See the insurance companies below who claim to offer competitive cover at sensible prices, our guide to the jargon and tips for cutting your quote - Good Luck:-

 

 

1ST QUOTE

4YOUNG DRIVERS.CO.UK

17 TO 40

A QUOTE INSURANCE

AA CAR INSURANCE

ACCEPT DIRECT

ADMIRAL CAR INSURANCE

ADRIAN FLUX - SPECIALIST INSURANCE

ASDA CAR INSURANCE

AUTOTRADER

AXA

BARCLAYS

BELL

BUDGET

CENTRAL DIRECT VEHICLE INSURANCE

CHURCHILL

COMPARE THE MARKET

CONFUSED.COM

CORNHILL DIRECT

DIAL DIRECT

DIAMOND

DIRECT LINE

EAGLE STAR

EASY MONEY INSURANCE

ECARINSURANCE.CO.UK

ELEPHANT.CO.UK

ENDSLEIGH

EQUITY RED STAR MOTOR POLICIES

ESURE

FOOL.CO.UK

FORD CAR INSURANCE

FORTIS

GROUPAMA

HALIFAX ONLINE CAR INSURANCE

HASTINGS DIRECT

HSBC car insurance

INSURANCE NOW.CO.UK

INSURE.CO.UK

ITS4ME

 

 

KWIK FIT

LEGAL & GENERAL

LIVERPOOL VICTORIA

LLOYDS TSB CAR INSURANCE

LOCAL BROKER.CO.UK

MASTER QUOTE

MARKS & SPENCER

MONEY SUPERMARKET.COM

MORE THAN - Sun Alliance

MOTOR QUOTE DIRECT

MOTOWORLD

N.I.G CAR INSURANCE

NORWICH UNION

PEOPLES CHOICE

PERFORMANCE DIRECT

POST OFFICE

PRIVILEGE

PROVIDENT FINANCIAL

PRUDENTIAL

QUOTE DIRECT

RAC

ROYAL & SUN ALLIANCE

SABRE INSURANCE

SAGA

SAINSBURYS BANK

SCREENTRADE CAR INSURANCE

SHEILAS WHEELS

SMARTER MONEY.COM

SONAR DIRECT.CO.UK

SWIFTCOVER

QUICK CAR QUOTE

QUINN DIRECT CAR INSURANCE

QUOTE ZONE CAR INSURANCE

TESCO 

THE INSURANCE CENTRE

TINY QUOTES.CO.UK

VIRGIN

YES INSURANCE.CO.UK

YOUR FINANCE.BIZ

ZURICH

 

Automotive Prehistory Links

CONTACTS

 

 

 

 

The world's fastest electric land speed record car, a blue bird eco streamliner

 

The blue bird legend continues: the beautiful BE3 above was inspired by the designs of Reid Railton for Malcolm Campbell and Ken Norris for Donald Campbell. The Blueplanet is thought to be the world's fastest electric car: 350mph + using energy from nature. Featuring built in battery cartridge exchange, charged using renewable solar energy. Sponsors sought for the 2016 season.

 

 

 

 

BLUEPLANET BE3 ELECTRIC  |   EDUCATION   |  ELECTRIC CYCLES  SOLARNAVIGATOR

The content of this website is copyright © 1991 and 2014 Electrick Publications. All rights reserved. The bluebird logo Bluebird electric motors, solar panels and batteries logo, trademark legendand name Bluebird and Blue Max are trademarks.  The BE2 and BE3 vehicle shape and configuration are registered designs ®.  All other trademarks are hereby acknowledged.  Max Energy Limited is an educational charity.